An IRA makes saving for the future less taxing

IRAs offer an opportunity to save for a comfortable retirement and long-term tax advantages too.

Size up the basic IRA types

Roth and traditional IRAs overlap in some areas but go their own way in others. We can help you understand the differences.

Factors like your age, your income, and possible tax consequences may influence whether you choose a Roth or traditional IRA.

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A traditional IRA lets you postpone taxes

  • Want to put off your tax bill while you put away money for your retirement? Think traditional IRA.
  • What is a traditional IRA?

  • A traditional IRA is a type of individual retirement account that lets your earnings grow tax-deferred. You pay taxes on your investment gains only when you make withdrawals in retirement.
  • Benefits

  • Contributions may be tax-deductible.
  • Earnings grow tax-deferred.
  • Eligibility not limited by income.
  • Considerations

  • No contributions allowed after age 70½.
  • Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) must start at age 70½
  • A portion of your withdrawals may be taxable.
  • Learn more about traditional IRAs

A Roth IRA offers tax-free withdrawals

  • With a Roth IRA, you get a future bonus: Every penny you withdraw in retirement stays in your pocket, not Uncle Sam's.
  • What is a Roth IRA?

  • A Roth IRA is an individual retirement account that offers tax-free growth and tax-free withdrawals in retirement. Roth IRA rules dictate that as long as you've owned your account for 5 years and you're age 59½ or older, you can withdraw your money when you want to and you won't owe any federal taxes.
  • Benefits

  • No taxes on withdrawals of contributions.
  • No taxes on earnings.
  • No required minimum distributions (RMDs) for as long as you live.
  • No age limit to open the IRA or contribute to it.
  • Considerations

  • Eligibility and contribution amounts could be limited by your income.
  • Contributions can't be deducted.